3 hours ago

WarrenHall Crain

THE SPACE AGE BEGINS

The 1960s began The Space Age:

• 1961–April 12, Yuri Gagarin, Russian Cosmonaut, makes the first suborbital flight.
• 1961–May 1, Alan Shepard, American Astronaut, makes the second suborbital flight.
• 1961–May 25, President Kennedy famously declares, “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.” (The goal was achieved.)
• 1962–Astronaut John Glenn is the first human to orbit the globe.
• 1967–The musical “Hair” features a song by James Rado and Gerome Ragni whose first lines can be considered an ode to human fascination with the wider universe:

“Good morning, starshine
The Earth says hello
You twinkle above us
We twinkle below”

• 1968—The movie “2001: A Space Odyssey,” created by the future historian Arthur C. Clarke and the cinematic genius Stanley Kubrick–now in 50th anniversary re-release–is considered one of the most important movies of all time, posing questions humans continue to pursue: Where did we come from? Where are we going?
[A personal note: I saw the original “2001: A Space Odyssey” in Cinemascope with my father in Manhattan. I hope to see it again in its re-release.]
• 1969—July 20, American Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin make the first human moon landing as Michael Collins pilots the Apollo 11 craft overhead.

So now we are in the sixth decade of the Age of Space.

My forthcoming book, a future history to publish in 2019, is titled FUTURE CHRONICLES: THE FIRST 500 YEARS OF THE AGE OF SPACE. It will be a history of the Space Age ... the nearly 60 years that have already elapsed and the 440 years to come.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
23 May 2018
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2 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

SETI: THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Three weeks ago NASA launched TESS, a small satellite that, for the next 2 years, will use powerful cameras to LOOK into the sky, seeking Earthlike planets that might support intelligent life.

And for the next 60 days, the powerful CSIRO Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia will LISTEN for radio signals from space that may suggest an intelligent source. (The project is named BREAKTHROUGH LISTEN.)

Whether looking from Earth orbit ... or listening from Australia ... the search for intelligent life goes on ... as does the question “What will happen if we find it?”

My next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (2019), will provide an answer.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
11 May 2018
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2 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

SETI: THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Three weeks ago NASA launched TESS, a small satellite that, for the next 2 years, will use powerful cameras to LOOK into the sky, seeking Earthlike planets that might support intelligent life.

And for the next 60 days, the powerful CSIRO Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia will LISTEN for radio signals from space that may suggest an intelligent source. (The project is named BREAKTHROUGH LISTEN.)

Whether looking from Earth orbit ... or listening from Australia ... the search for intelligent life goes on ... as does the question “What will happen if we find it?”

My next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (2019), will provide an answer.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
11 May 2018
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4 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

“WHERE TIGERS ROAM THE FORESTS...”

The World Wildlife Fund now offers a “Symbolic Adoption” program. A donation helps make sure tigers and hundreds of other species survive on our planet. For your gift you can choose a species you want to adopt and receive a kit that includes a stuffed toy (like the toy tiger shown), an adoption certificate, and a photo and information about your chosen species. The kit makes a wonderful gift for a child and a lesson about our human responsibility for all the world’s creatures.

On page 105 of my book THE MESSAGE, Kiran Verma’s poem “Always” envisions a Utopian world “Where tigers roam the forests, And great whales roam the seas.” So I chose the photo of the tiger from the WWF Symbolic Adoption site: bit.ly/2dK0x8c.

My book THE MESSAGE — that includes Kiran Verma’s poem — is listed on Amazon at amzn.to/1Au8iAd. You can read it free if you belong to Kindle Unlimited.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
1 May 2018
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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS — OFF TO SEEK ALIEN WORLDS

Go to bit.ly/2Jcjhcm to see a video of TESS’s launch — perfect launch on Wednesday, April 18.

TESS herself will not go to the stars. The little spacecraft (about the size of a washing machine) has nestled into an orbit between Earth and the moon. But, starting in June, her telescopes will spend two years searching the sky for nearby stars orbited by planets with Earthlike conditions, some of which may support intelligent life.

TESS will help to answer the age-old question: Are we alone?

“Ad astra per aspira,” is the motto of the state of Kansas, a Latin phrase that means “To the stars through difficulties.”

There are difficulties to overcome as we explore the universe and reach out to other stars and planets. But TESS (a cooperative project of NASA and SpaceX) is a major step on the journey.

I watched the rocket launch Wednesday. Perhaps you did, too. VERY EXCITING TO BE SURE!

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 April 2018
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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS — OFF TO SEEK ALIEN WORLDS

Go to bit.ly/2Jcjhcm to see a video of TESS’s launch — a perfect launch on Wednesday, April 18.

TESS herself will not go to the stars. The little spacecraft (about the size of a washing machine) has nestled into an orbit between Earth and the moon. But, starting in June, her telescopes will spend two years searching the sky for nearby stars. Some are probably orbited by planets with Earthlike conditions, which might support intelligent life.

TESS will help to answer the age-old question: Are we alone?

“Ad astra per aspira,” is the motto of the state of Kansas, a Latin phrase that means “To the stars through difficulties.”

There are difficulties to overcome as we explore the universe and reach out to other stars and planets. But TESS (a cooperative project of NASA and SpaceX) is a major step on the journey.

I watched the rocket launch Wednesday. Perhaps you did, too. VERY EXCITING TO BE SURE!

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 April 2018
...

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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS IS READY TO GO

She is now inside the fairing, shown in the photo, heading into the servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida — on track for launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Monday, April 16th, at 6:32 PM Eastern time (3:32 p.m. Pacific time; 4:02 a.m. Tuesday in India).

TESS’s mission: Searching the sky for nearby Earthlike planets, some of which may support intelligent life, some perhaps near enough for robot visits. It will take about 60 days for Tess to settle into her orbit between Earth and the moon and begin the search.

A reader of my earlier post about TESS, Terry Ford, asked “What if they find Klingon, or Borg?” I replied “We can hope that they are seeking intergalactic peace.”

My book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (to publish next year) records a future history when humans — traveling at or faster than the speed of light — meet the inhabitants of another world: the people of the planet AH-TOO.

Follow TESS’s launch LIVE on www.space.com.

Prelaunch coverage begins on NASA TV on Sunday April 15th, which will also broadcast the launch.

Here is a link to the space.com article — published on April 13th — with details about TESS. www.space.com/40299-spacex-rocket-ready-for-tess-launch.html

Let’s all watch the launch of TESS and follow the news of her mission over the next couple of years.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 April 2018
...

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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS IS READY TO GO

She is now inside the fairing, shown in the photo, heading into the servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida — on track for launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Monday, April 16th, at 6:32 PM Eastern time (3:32 p.m. Pacific time; 4:02 a.m. Tuesday in India).

TESS’s mission: Searching the sky for nearby Earthlike planets, some of which may support intelligent life, some perhaps near enough for robot visits. It will take about 60 days for Tess to settle into her orbit between Earth and the moon and begin the search.

A reader of my earlier post about TESS, Terry Ford, asked “What if they find Klingon, or Borg?” I replied “We can hope that they are seeking intergalactic peace.”

My book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (to publish next year) records a future history when humans — traveling at or faster than the speed of light — meet the inhabitants of another world: the people of the planet AH-TOO.

Follow TESS’s launch LIVE on www.space.com.
Prelaunch coverage begins on NASA TV on Sunday April 15th, which will also broadcast the launch.

Here is a link to the space.com article — published on April 13th — with details about TESS. www.space.com/40299-spacex-rocket-ready-for-tess-launch.html

Let’s all watch the launch of TESS and follow the news of her mission over the next couple of years.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 April 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

ARE THERE OTHER EARTHS?
TESS MAY FIND OUT.

“No earlier than 6:32 p.m. on April 16th,” NASA promises, a little spacecraft called TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) will ride a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to a spot between Earth and the moon. Its job: To spend at least two years there, searching space for alien worlds.

TESS will be looking for nearby planets, ones close enough to examine with telescopes – maybe close enough for a robot to visit.

The TESS research team thinks the little spacecraft will find some 500 Earth-sized planets within a range of 300 light years. Some might be home to intelligent inhabitants. The nearest could be as close as 10 to 15 light-years.

Can humans travel at the speed of light? (So we could get to one of those nearby planets in a mere 10 or 15-year trip – and maybe live long enough to get home again?) Einstein and other scientists have said it is impossible for an object (such as a spacecraft) to travel as fast or faster than the speed of light.
However, future technologies may prove it can be done.

My book FUTURE CHRONICLES: THE FIRST 500 YEARS OF THE AGE OF SPACE (to publish next year) records a future history when humans — traveling at or faster than the speed of light — meet the inhabitants of another world: the people of the planet AH-TOO.

Meanwhile, read more about TESS in the New York Times article at nyti.ms/2GpD3Am ... and join me in watching for what TESS may reveal about alien worlds during the next couple of years.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
3 April 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

ARE THERE OTHER EARTHS?
TESS MAY FIND OUT.

“No earlier than 6:32 p.m. on April 16th,” NASA promises, a little spacecraft called TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) will ride a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to a spot between Earth and the moon. Its job: To spend at least two years there, searching space for alien worlds.

TESS will be looking for nearby planets, ones close enough to examine with telescopes – maybe close enough for a robot to visit.

The TESS research team thinks the little spacecraft will find some 500 Earth-sized planets within a range of 300 light years. Some might be home to intelligent inhabitants. The nearest could be as close as 10 to 15 light-years.

Can humans travel at the speed of light? (So we could get to one of those nearby planets in a mere 10 or 15-year trip – and maybe live long enough to get home again?) Einstein and other scientists have said it is impossible for an object (such as a spacecraft) to travel as fast or faster than the speed of light.
However, future technologies may prove it can be done.

My book FUTURE CHRONICLES: THE FIRST 500 YEARS OF THE AGE OF SPACE (to publish next year) records a future history when humans — traveling at or faster than the speed of light — meet the inhabitants of another world: the people of the planet AH-TOO.

Meanwhile, read more about TESS in the New York Times article at nyti.ms/2GpD3Am ... and join me in watching for what TESS may reveal about alien worlds during the next couple of years.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
3 April 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

WHO WILL GIVE AN ORPHAN AN EDUCATION?
SAVE THE CHILDREN

There are over 18 million children in the world who have lost their mothers and fathers.

Save the Children has an Orphan Education program. They find overlooked, eager-to-learn children, pay their tuition, and purchase their school supplies. Giving orphaned children an opportunity to learn lets that them know they have not been forgotten.

Anyone who has a bit of extra money to put to a good use may be interested in Save the Children’s “Gifts of Joy” catalog. A gift of $75 will provide an educational opportunity for one child somewhere in the world.

Here is the link to the Orphan Education section of Save the Children’s Gifts of Joy catalog: bit.ly/2pBJGIG

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
24 March 2018
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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

WHO WILL GIVE AN EDUCATION TO AN ORPHAN?
SAVE THE CHILDREN

There are over 18 million children in the world who have lost their mothers and fathers.

Save the Children has an Orphan Education program. They find overlooked, eager-to-learn children, pay their tuition, and purchase their school supplies. Giving orphaned children an opportunity to learn lets that them know they have not been forgotten.

Anyone who has a bit of extra money to put to a good use may be interested in Save the Children’s “Gifts of Joy” catalog. A gift of $75 will provide an educational opportunity for one child somewhere in the world.

Here is the link to the Orphan Education section of Save the Children’s Gifts of Joy catalog: bit.ly/2pBJGIG

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
24 March 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

WINNING THE WAR ON POLLUTION

These photos exaggerate China’s success in fighting pollution. The photo at left was taken in Beijing on a very bad day in 2013. The photo at right was taken on a very good day early this year. But it’s true: After declaring war on air pollution in 2014, China has made major strides toward cleaner air.

How have they done it? Starting in 2014, China prohibited new coal-fired power plants in polluted regions including Beijing. Existing plants had to reduce emissions or replace coal with natural gas. Big cities restricted the number of cars on the road. Last summer, coal boilers were removed from many homes and businesses, even where replacements were not ready, leaving many people without heat this past winter.

Targets have been met and air quality is noticeably, and measurably, greatly improved.

The United States underwent its own air pollution crisis in the 1950s with cities like Pittsburgh and Los Angeles experiencing killer smogs. The federal Clean Air Act of 1970 brought major improvements in cities across the nation. Market forces such as low-cost wind and solar power continue to improve America’s air quality.

The United States and China still have a long way to go, and many parts of the world — including Delhi in my other home country — are still choking in killer air pollution. But ongoing successes in China and the United States show that the war on air pollution can — and must — be won.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 March 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

CHINA IS WINNING ITS WAR ON POLLUTION

These photos exaggerate China’s success in fighting pollution. The photo at left was taken in Beijing on a very bad day in 2013. The photo at right was taken on a very good day early this year. But it’s true: After declaring war on air pollution in 2014, China has made major strides toward cleaner air.

How have they done it? Starting in 2014, China prohibited new coal-fired power plants in polluted regions including Beijing. Existing plants had to reduce emissions or replace coal with natural gas. Big cities restricted the number of cars on the road. Last summer, coal boilers were removed from many homes and businesses, even where replacements were not ready, leaving many people without heat this past winter.

Targets have been met and air quality is noticeably, and measurably, greatly improved.

The United States underwent its own air pollution crisis in the 1950s with cities like Pittsburgh and Los Angeles experiencing killer smogs. The federal Clean Air Act of 1970 brought major improvements in cities across the nation. Market forces such as low-cost wind and solar power continue to improve America’s air quality.

The United States and China still have a long way to go, and many parts of the world — including Delhi in my other home country — are still choking in killer air pollution. But ongoing successes in China and the United States show that the war on air pollution can — and must — be won.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 March 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

HALF OF EARTH MUST STAY WILD

ONE THING threatens Earth even more than climate change – the extinction of species.

Perhaps we can stabilize Earth’s climate by reducing carbon emissions and developing technologies such as carbon removal and sunlight deflection. Humans probably have the brains to halt and correct climate change ... if we have the will.

Species extinction is the other major threat to Earth. Extinction of species by human activity is accelerating at a pace to eliminate more than half of all species by the end of this century — destabilizing Earth’s billion-year-old environmental support system. And while climate changes can be corrected, extinct species are gone forever. Extinctions must be prevented. They cannot be corrected.

Can we curb this death-spiral of species extinction? Conservation scientists have proposed a formula — called the HALF-EARTH PROJECT. It means we must keep half the land and half the sea of the planet wild — as protected from human activity as possible.

Which places to protect? Scientists recommend three criteria: (1) areas judged best in number and rareness of species by experienced field biologists. (2) “Hot spots,” — localities with many important species of groups such as birds and trees . (3) Areas of particular geography and vegetation, called “ecoregions.”

Many land and marine areas around the globe are already protected by national and international laws and agreements. Many more need protection.

In my next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES — now in progress — I am writing about the establishment of national and global parks in the Third Century of THE AGE OF SPACE — including the PACIFIC TEMPERATE ZONE FOREST stretching from Muir woods, near San Francisco, to the Columbia Glacier in Alaska.

Edward O. Wilson, Harvard University Professor Emeritus, heads the E. O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation (website eowilsonfoundation.org/e-o-wilson/ ). You can find his column about the Half-Earth Project published 8 March 2018 in the New York Times at nyti.ms/2oPBFiK .

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
6 March 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

WE MUST KEEP HALF OUR PLANET WILD

ONE THING threatens Earth even more than climate change – the extinction of species.

Perhaps we can stabilize Earth’s climate by reducing carbon emissions and developing technologies such as carbon removal and sunlight deflection. Humans probably have the brains to halt and correct climate change ... if we have the will.

Species extinction is the other major threat to Earth. Extinction of species by human activity is accelerating at a pace to eliminate more than half of all species by the end of this century — destabilizing Earth’s billion-year-old environmental support system. And while climate changes can be corrected, extinct species are gone forever. Extinctions must be prevented. They cannot be corrected.

Can we curb this death-spiral of species extinction?

Conservation scientists have proposed a formula — called the HALF-EARTH PROJECT. It means we must keep half the land and half the sea of the planet wild — as protected from human activity as possible.

Which places to protect? Scientists recommend three criteria: (1) areas judged best in number and rareness of species by experienced field biologists. (2) “Hot spots,” — localities with many important species of groups such as birds and trees . (3) Areas of particular geography and vegetation, called “ecoregions.”

Many land and marine areas around the globe are already protected by national and international laws and agreements. Many more need protection.

In my next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES — now in progress — I am writing about the establishment of national and global parks in the Third Century of THE AGE OF SPACE — including the PACIFIC TEMPERATE ZONE FOREST stretching from Muir woods, near San Francisco, to the Columbia Glacier in Alaska.

Edward O. Wilson, Harvard University Professor Emeritus, heads the E. O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation (website eowilsonfoundation.org/e-o-wilson/ ). You can find his column about the Half-Earth Project published 8 March 2018 in the New York Times at nyti.ms/2oPBFiK .

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
5 March 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

“ALL THINGS CONNECT”

CHIEF SEATTLE was a 19th century chief of the Suquamish and Duwamish tribes in the area of Puget Sound. The city of Seattle is named for him.

Known for his espousal of ecological stewardship, in 1855 he spoke these words (translated from the Lushootseed Indian language):

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”

Yes, Chief, all things connect. Today, 163 years since you gave us your counsel — in addition to protecting the ecological web of life — it is most important that human beings connect, particularly across racial, national, and religious lines.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
27 February 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

YES ... “ALL THINGS CONNECT”

CHIEF SEATTLE was a 19th century chief of the Suquamish and Duwamish tribes in the area of Puget Sound. The city of Seattle is named for him.

Known for his espousal of ecological stewardship, in 1855 he spoke these words (translated from the Lushootseed Indian language):

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”

Yes, Chief, all things connect. Today, 163 years since you gave us your counsel — in addition to protecting the ecological web of life — it is most important that human beings connect, particularly across racial, national, and religious lines.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
27 February 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

“THE RETURNING HOSTS ... STILL LOVE THIS BEAUTIFUL LAND”

CHIEF SEATTLE was a 19th century chief of the Suquamish and Duwamish tribes in the area of Puget Sound. The city of Seattle is named for him.

In 1854, when the U. S. Government-appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs for Washington Territory arrived, it is said that Chief Seattle rose to speak.

“The sable braves, and fond mothers, and glad-hearted maidens, and the little children who lived and rejoiced here, and whose very names are now forgotten, still love these solitudes.... At night, when the streets of your cities and villages shall be silent, and you think them deserted, they will throng with the returning hosts that once filled and still love this beautiful land.”

Chief Seattle’s exact words have been lost through translation and rewriting from the Lushootseed Indian dialect he spoke. But the above lines are often included. These thoughts echo still, from Puget Sound across the lands and waters of our globe, admonishing us all.

We must be stewards of the Earth ... for those who came before us ... and for ourselves ... and for those who will come after us.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
19 February 2018
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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

ON FEBRUARY 14, LOVE THY NEIGHBOR

Vishal Negi, from Dehra Dun, India, invites all of us to participate in ROTI DAY on 14 February. On Roti Day, the Indian flatbread called roti along with vegetables and other foods will be gathered and distributed to the poor and needy. It is a way to express love on Valentine’s Day.

Following up on Vishal’s idea, I have made a contribution to Rotary First Harvest. This program solicits surplus fruits and vegetables from eastern Washington and brings them into the Seattle area for distribution to local food banks. (In fact, Rotary First Harvest distributes produce to food banks all across Washington State.)

EXPRESS A DIFFERENT KIND OF LOVE THIS VALENTINE’S DAY.
Love thy neighbor.
Contribute to your local Food Bank ... or similar organization.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
10 February 2018
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2 Comments on “Facebook Posts”

  1. Pingback: (E MINUS 140) 1 NOVEMBER 2015 #7 TRAGEDY ON THE AEGEAN — AMERICA MUST HELP - WarrenHall Crain for Kiran Verma's Vision

  2. U Kyaw Win

    Warren Crain is a prolific writer/story teller. His books are a good read which speaks from his heart about the human condition.

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