LIGHT A CANDLE

These are dark days in many parts of the world, and it is easy to become discouraged.

But in fact it is a good time to remember the words of Eleanor Roosevelt: “It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.” —Not just to think positively but to act positively.

Here are some ideas:
• Join a worthy organizaiton.
• Contribute some money, even a small amount, to a good cause.
• Help a family member, a friend, or a neighbor.
• Help a stranger.
• Speak up for for your principles.

Comment to add your ideas . Tell us about something you have done or may do to bring light to theworld ... or to your corner of it.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
16 December 2017
...

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LIGHT A CANDLE

These are dark days in many parts of the world, and it is easy to become discouraged.

But in fact it is a good time to remember the words of Eleanor Roosevelt: “It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.” —Not just to think positively but to act positively.

Here are some ideas:
• Join a worthy organization.
• Contribute some money, even a small amount, to a good cause.
• Help a family member, a friend, or a neighbor.
• Help a stranger.
• Speak up for for your principles.

Comment to add your ideas . Tell us about something you have done or may do to bring light to the world ... or to your corner of it.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 December 2017
...

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FREE DOWNLOAD ($0.00)
DECEMBER 9-13 AT amzn.to/2kkCi5f

INDIA LAYS CLAIM TO ME. I grew up in India and, for more than 20 years now, I have spent half of each year there, making my home with a family in Khajuraho, a small town in the centre of the country, and traveling widely. India long ago laid claim to me, and although I hold an American passport, I often assert that I am a proper Indian.

“READINGS FROM AN INDIA JOURNAL” is a selection of 101 from more than 400 entries to my India journal. In these entries, I write about the REAL India – not just the glory of the Taj Mahal, but about India’s everyday people, places, and events.

I want to share my India Journal with as many readers as possible, so I AM GIVING IT AWAY – A FREE KINDLE DOWNLOAD – FROM DECEMBER 9-13. Click here:

amzn.to/2kkCi5f

AND PLEASE POST YOUR REVIEW ON AMAZON.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
9 December 2017
...

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FREE DOWNLOAD ($0.00)
DECEMBER 9-13AT amzn.to/2kkCi5f

INDIA LAYS CLAIM TO ME. I grew up in India and, for more than 20 years now, I have spent half of each year there, making my home with a family in Khajuraho, a small town in the centre of the country, and traveling widely. India long ago laid claim to me, and although I hold an American passport, I often assert that I am a proper Indian.

“READINGS FROM AN INDIA JOURNAL” is a selection of 101 from more than 400 entries to my India journal. In these entries, I write about the REAL India – not just the glory of the Taj Mahal, but about India’s everyday people, places, and events.
Here, for example, is the beginning of my entry “THE OLD FARMER.”

‘TOWEL OVER ONE shoulder, sacred thread over the other, he stands in the doorway in the hazy afternoon sunlight. It has just rained, and the air is clear and fresh. He stands erect and sure, waiting for his daughter-in-law to bring lota and bucket and rope so that he can go to the well for his afternoon bath. He is still handsome at 73. His years in the fields have kept him strong, and today to me, as I watch him through the doorway, he embodies the deep strength of India, this rich land in which sixty percent of the people still live in villages....’

I want to share my India Journal with as many readers as possible, so I AM GIVING IT AWAY – A FREE KINDLE DOWNLOAD – FOR FIVE DAYS FROM DECEMBER 9-13. (The $0.00 price starts at midnight Pacific time on the first day and lasts until midnight Pacific time on the last day.)

Again -- Get your FREE ($0.00) download –from December 9-13 --by clicking here:

amzn.to/2kkCi5f

AND AFTER YOU READ IT, PLEASE POST YOUR REVIEW ON AMAZON.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
9 December 2017
...

View on Facebook

FREE DOWNLOAD ($0.00)
DECEMBER 9-13 AT amzn.to/2kkCi5f

INDIA LAYS CLAIM TO ME. I grew up in India and, for more than 20 years now, I have spent half of each year there, making my home with a family in Khajuraho, a small town in the centre of the country, and traveling widely. India long ago laid claim to me, and although I hold an American passport, I often assert that I am a proper Indian.

“READINGS FROM AN INDIA JOURNAL” is a selection of 101 from more than 400 entries to my India journal. In these entries, I write about the REAL India – not just the glory of the Taj Mahal, but about India’s everyday people, places, and events.
Here, for example, is the beginning of my entry “THE OLD FARMER.”

‘TOWEL OVER ONE shoulder, sacred thread over the other, he stands in the doorway in the hazy afternoon sunlight. It has just rained, and the air is clear and fresh. He stands erect and sure, waiting for his daughter-in-law to bring lota and bucket and rope so that he can go to the well for his afternoon bath. He is still handsome at 73. His years in the fields have kept him strong, and today to me, as I watch him through the doorway, he embodies the deep strength of India, this rich land in which sixty percent of the people still live in villages....’

I want to share my India Journal with as many readers as possible, so I AM GIVING IT AWAY – A FREE KINDLE DOWNLOAD – FOR FIVE DAYS FROM DECEMBER 9-13. (The $0.00 price starts at midnight Pacific time on the first day and lasts until midnight Pacific time on the last day.)

Again -- Get your FREE ($0.00) download –from December 9-13 --by clicking here:

amzn.to/2kkCi5f

AND AFTER YOU READ IT, PLEASE POST YOUR REVIEW ON AMAZON.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
9 December 2017
...

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DO PASSWORDS DRIVE YOU CRAZY?
INDIA HAS THE ANSWER

India is rapidly working to leapfrog itself out of poverty and become a world economic leader by digitizing its entire economy and power grid. Thomas Friedman, the columnist, has just visited the country. “I was blown away by one big change in India,” he writes.

Friedman then describes a national digital identify system, known as Aadhaar (Hindi for “base”), that has been under development since 2009.

“Every Indian, rich or poor, goes into a field office, has fingerprints and irises scanned into a biometric database and then linked to the individual’s 12-digit ID number with basic identifiers: name, address, date of birth, and sex.” The Aadhaar project now has 1.18 billion users out of an Indian population of 1.3 billion.

This has been a revolution. Even poor people who never had access to any form of ID can now open a bank account, buy, sell, transfer money, and receive payments digitally anytime anywhere. Citizens can go to any of 250,000 community centers with access to a computer.

“It is transforming the lives of ordinary people,” one observer says, “and could generate as much as $1 trillion in economic value over the next decade.”

INDIA SCANS FINGERPRINTS AND IRISES TO IDENTIFY INDIVIDUALS – NO NEED FOR PASSWORDS.

WHY CAN’T IT BE DONE IN THE USA?

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
2 December 2017
...

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A TALE OF TWO WEDDINGS

In the past two months I was honored to be invited to two weddings, one Muslim and one Hindu.

I had just returned to the United States from Peace Corps service in Kyrgyzstan with a short visit to India en route. When I received the two wedding invitations, I turned right around and went back.

To read the story of these two weddings and see all the photos, go to this link on my website: warrenhallcrain.com/26-november-2017-39-tale-two-weddings/

The photos bring memories of these two wonderful weddings rushing back. So I am somewhat homesick for Kyrgyzstan and India, but I will be returning for visits.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
25 November 2017
...

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A TALE OF TWO WEDDINGS

In the past two months I was honored to be invited to two weddings, one Muslim and one Hindu.

I had just returned to the United States from Peace Corps service in Kyrgyzstan with a short visit to India en route. When I received the two wedding invitations, I turned right around and went back.

To read the story of these two weddings and see all the photos, go to this link on my website: warrenhallcrain.com/26-november-2017-39-tale-two-weddings/

The photos bring memories of these two wonderful weddings rushing back. So I am somewhat homesick for Kyrgyzstan and India, but I will be returning for visits.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
25 November 2017
...

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SHOULD ELEPHANT TROPHY IMPORTS BE BANNED?

Elephant populations have drastically fallen as they are killed by hunters and poachers . Their body parts, especially their ivory tusks, are sold. Many hunters bring home “trophies” – such as tusks or tails – from the elephants they kill.

In 2014 the United States banned importing trophies from legally hunted elephants in Zambia and Zimbabwe. President Trump is considering lifting the ban.

The reason? These two countries have documented that their elephant populations are now stable. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says that money paid for permits to hunt the elephants could put “much-needed revenue back into conservation.”

Conservation groups disagree, expressing grave concerns that lifting the ban will send a message around the world that hunting and poaching elephants is “on” again, causing elephant populations to plummet.

Elephants are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Last Wednesday, President Trump announced that the ban on elephant trophy imports from Zambia and Zimbabwe would be lifted. On Friday he put a hold on the decision “until such time as I review all conservation facts.”

What is your opinion? Should the ban on elephant trophy imports be lifted or retained? Please add your comment.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
19 November 2017

Sources:
blog.conservation.org/2017/11/u-s-lifts-ban-on-some-elephant-trophy-imports/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkK...

www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/11/15/trophies-from-elephant-hunts-in-zimbabwe-were-...
...

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SHOULD ELEPHANT TROPHY IMPORTS BE BANNED?

Elephant populations have drastically fallen as they are killed by hunters and poachers . Their body parts, especially their ivory tusks, are sold. Many hunters bring home “trophies” – such as tusks or tails – from the elephants they kill.

In 2014 the United States banned importing trophies from legally hunted elephants in Zambia and Zimbabwe. President Trump is considering lifting the ban.

The reason? These two countries have documented that their elephant populations are now stable. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says that money paid for permits to hunt the elephants could put “much-needed revenue back into conservation.”

Conservation groups disagree, expressing grave concerns that lifting the ban will send a message around the world that hunting and poaching elephants is “on” again, causing elephant populations to plummet.

Elephants are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Last Wednesday, President Trump announced that the ban on elephant trophy imports from Zambia and Zimbabwe would be lifted. On Friday he put a hold on the decision “until such time as I review all conservation facts.”

What is your opinion? Should the ban on elephant trophy imports be lifted or retained? Please add your comment.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
19 November 2017

Sources:
blog.conservation.org/2017/11/u-s-lifts-ban-on-some-elephant-trophy-imports/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkK...

www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/11/15/trophies-from-elephant-hunts-in-zimbabwe-were-...
...

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GOOD NEWS: FIVE TRUTHS ABOUT ENERGY AND CLIMATE

Here are five true things about how we produce energy( (from a recent New York Times editorial).

1. COAL IS ON ITS WAY OUT. Coal mines are closing at a rapid rate. Why? Because we recognize that emissions from burning coal cause air pollution and climate warming. AND because other forms of energy are now more economical.

2. NATURAL GAS IS BEATING COAL. Utilities are switching from coal to natural gas, which has become much cheaper and produces only about half as much carbon dioxide per unit of energy as coal. (HOWEVER, natural gas, like coal, is not renewable, and care must be taken to avoid leaks of climate-damaging methane gas during its production.)

3. RENEWABLE ENERGY IS COMING ON STRONG. The worldwide cost of renewable energy (chiefly wind and solar) has dropped sharply. Two-thirds of energy generation capacity added globally last year was from renewables.

4. WIND AND SOLAR ARE GETTING CHEAPER EVERY YEAR. In some countries, including India, the United Arab Emirates, Mexico, and Chile, renewable energy prices have fallen so much they are comparable to or lower than the cost of newly built coal or gas energy plants – and wind and solar costs are expected to fall another 15 and 25%, respectively, in the next five years.

5. THE COST OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES IS PLUNGING. Batteries are needed to store wind and solar energy for times when the wind isn’t blowing or the sun isn’t shining. The cost of lithium-ion batteries fell 73% between 2010 and 2016.

GOOD NEWS FOR PLANET EARTH.

WarrenHall Crain
Tacoma, Washington
5 November 2017
...

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MAHATMA GANDHI, whom I call Gandhi Ji to show my deep respect for him, was an inspiration not just to me, not just to the Indian people, but to the world.

In a testament to his influence across the globe, the United Nations General Assembly in 2007 declared October 2 the “International Day of Non-Violence” in his honor. Gandhi Ji’s insistence on nonviolent resistance to evil inspired the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and other leaders of the American civil rights movement.

I am an American citizen who grew up in India. India long ago laid claim to my heart, and I consider myself to be an Indian as well as an American. I spend half of each year my Indian hometown, Khajuraho, and the other half in my American hometown, Seattle.

This year I was privileged to be in India on October 2 on the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti. His example is, today, more important than ever.

WarrenHall Crain
Delhi, India
5 November 2017
...

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GOOD NEWS: FIVE TRUTHS ABOUT ENERGY AND CLIMATE

Here are five true things about how we produce energy( (from a recent New York Times editorial).

1. COAL IS ON ITS WAY OUT. Coal mines are closing at a rapid rate. Why? Because we recognize that emissions from burning coal cause air pollution and climate warming. AND because other forms of energy are now more economical.

2. NATURAL GAS IS BEATING COAL. Utilities are switching from coal to natural gas, which has become much cheaper and produces only about half as much carbon dioxide per unit of energy as coal. (HOWEVER, natural gas, like coal, is not renewable, and care must be taken to avoid leaks of climate-damaging methane gas during its production.)

3. RENEWABLE ENERGY IS COMING ON STRONG. The worldwide cost of renewable energy (chiefly wind and solar) has dropped sharply. Two-thirds of energy generation capacity added globally last year was from renewables.

4. WIND AND SOLAR ARE GETTING CHEAPER EVERY YEAR. In some countries, including India, the United Arab Emirates, Mexico, and Chile, renewable energy prices have fallen so much they are comparable to or lower than the cost of newly built coal or gas energy plants – and wind and solar costs are expected to fall another 15 and 25%, respectively, in the next five years.

5. THE COST OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES IS PLUNGING. Batteries are needed to store wind and solar energy for times when the wind isn’t blowing or the sun isn’t shining. The cost of lithium-ion batteries fell 73% between 2010 and 2016.

GOOD NEWS FOR PLANET EARTH.

WarrenHall Crain
Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh, India
29 October 2017
...

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THE CORAL REEFS ARE DYING
CAN SUPER CORALS SAVE THEM?

Coral reefs are often called “the rain forests of the sea” for of their astounding richness of life.

They are more than merely beautiful. A half-blliion people around the world depend on reef fish for food. In some island nations, they are nearly the only source of protein. Continued destruction of coral reefs will worsen world hunger.

What is killing the coral reefs? Heat and acid are the major culprits. Both stem from global warming and the excess carbon dioxide that fuels it. Heat absorbed from the atmosphere raises water temperatures, while carbon dioxide dissolves and turns the seas acidic. Dumping of raw sewage has also been a reef destroyer.

Massive coral die-offs are now occurring around the globe. Some scientists estimate that half the coral reefs that existed in the early 20th century are gone.

“All dead,” declared Dr. Neal Cantin of the Australian Institute of Marine Science after a recent plunge to inspect a reef that had recently teemed with life.

But Dr. Cantin and other researchers are starting to find and gather samples of “super corals” ... living corals, hiding among the dead masses, that have somehow survived the die-offs. (In the photo, Dr. Cantin, at right, and a student gather coral samples.) They are experimenting with growing these hardy survivors in laboratories, encouraging rapid growth and reproduction, and pioneering techniques to introduce these super corals back into the seas to reestablish damaged and ruined reefs.

Some countries are banding together to create a genetic storage bank for super corals – a backup plan if today’s reefs all die.

We must save Earth’s coral reefs.

WarrenHall Crain
Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh, India
22 October, 2017
...

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FULL MOON OVER MUSSOORIE

Mussoorie, in the foothills of the Himalya, is one of the most breathtakingly beautiful places in India, indeed in the world. I spent a few days there last week and took this photo on the night of the full moon.

I attended the Woodstock School in Mussoorie from second form until my high school graduation in 1951, as my parents were missionaries in Burma. Woodstock, founded in 1854, is a coeducational residential international school. During last week’s visit, I spent some time with a dear friend who was one of my schoolmates in those long-ago years.

I was glad to capture this photo of Mussoorie and its nighttime sky. We must keep special places like Mussoorie always safe and beautiful.

Now I am spending some additional weeks in my Central Indian hometown, Khajuraho, before I return to the USA in November.

WarrenHall Crain
Khajuraho, Madhya Praesh, India
15 October 2017
...

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PROTECT THE BEAUTIFUL SNOW LEOPARD

The snow leopard’s classification has improved from “endangered” to “at risk” — still at risk of extinction because of poaching and habitat loss. It is poached because it is so beautiful and because its bones and other body parts are used in traditional Asian medicine.

Snow leopards exist mostly in Central Asia, including the mountainous areas of Kyrgyzstan where I recently completed four years of service as a Peace Corps volunteer. In September, I traveled back to Kyrgyzstan from the United States to visit friends and attend the wedding of one of my Kyrgyz students.

In his poem “Always,” Kiran Verma wrote of a world “Where tigers roam the forests, And great whales roam the seas.” (warrenhallcrain.com/always/) It is a vision of a world made safe for all its varied species, including the snow leopard, which must be protected and saved.

WarrenHall Crain
Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh, India
8 October 2017
...

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GANDHI JAYANTI (Gandhi Jubilee) is celebrated in India each year to mark the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi. I call him Gandhi Ji — “Ji” denoting the high respect in which I hold him.

Gandhi Ji was the leader of the movement that used nonviolent civil disobedience to gain India’s independence from Britain in 1947. His insistence on nonviolent resistance to evil inspired the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and other leaders of the American civil rights movement.

In a testament to Gandhi’s influence across the globe, the United Nations General Assembly in 2007 declared October 2 the “International Day of Non-Violence” in Gandhi’s honor.

This year I am privileged to be in India on October 2 on the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti. His example is, today, more important than ever.

WarrenHall Crain
Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 October 2017
...

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KEEP GOING

Harriet Tubman (1822–1913), escaped from slavery, then made 13 return missions to rescue some 70 family members and friends, leading them to freedom by a network of safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. During the Civil War, she was an armed scout and spy for the United States Army. After the war, she was active in the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Following her example, we must work to make our lives count for something good.

No matter the obstacles, keep going.

I’m eighty-three years old. I keep going.

WarrenHall Crain
27 September 2017
Bishkek, The Kyrgyz Republic
...

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KEEP GOING

Harriet Tubman (1822–1913), escaped from slavery, then made 13 return missions to rescue some 70 family members and friends, leading them to freedom by a network of safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. During the Civil War, she was an armed scout and spy for the United States Army. After the war, she was active in the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Following her example, we must work to make our lives count for something good.

No matter the obstacles, keep going.

I’m eighty-three years old. I keep going.

WarrenHall Crain
20 September 2017
Bishkek, The Kyrgyz Republic
...

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2 Comments on “Facebook Posts”

  1. Pingback: (E MINUS 140) 1 NOVEMBER 2015 #7 TRAGEDY ON THE AEGEAN — AMERICA MUST HELP - WarrenHall Crain for Kiran Verma's Vision

  2. U Kyaw Win

    Warren Crain is a prolific writer/story teller. His books are a good read which speaks from his heart about the human condition.

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