5 days ago

WarrenHall Crain

JAMES BALDWIN, AMERICAN NOVELIST AND SOCIAL CRITIC, was born and grew up in Harlem. As a student in New York City’s public school system, Baldwin later remarked, “I knew I was black, of course, but I also knew I was smart. I didn’t know how I would use my mind, or even if I could, but that was the only thing I had to use.”

His essays explored racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, notably mid-20th century America. His novels and plays fictionalize the dilemmas and struggles of African Americans and also of gay and bisexual men.

His best-known and admired works include “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” “Notes of a Native Son,” “The Fire Next Time,’ “Another Country,” and “Giovanni’s Room.”

Born in 1924, he died in 1987. His August 2nd birthday this year would have been his 94th.

Once asked if he was a pessimist or an optimist, he replied, "I can't be a pessimist because I'm alive. To be a pessimist means that you have agreed that human life is an academic matter, so I'm forced to be an optimist. I'm forced to believe that we can survive whatever we must survive."

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
10 August 2018
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6 days ago

WarrenHall Crain

JAMES BALDWIN, AMERICAN NOVELIST AND SOCIAL CRITIC, was born and grew up in Harlem. As a student in New York City’s public school system, Baldwin later remarked, “I knew I was black, of course, but I also knew I was smart. I didn’t know how I would use my mind, or even if I could, but that was the only thing I had to use.”

His essays explored racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, notably mid-20th century America. His novels and plays fictionalize the dilemmas and struggles of African Americans and also of gay and bisexual men.

His best-known and admired works include “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” “Notes of a Native Son,” “The Fire Next Time,’ “Another Country,” and “Giovanni’s Room.”

Born in 1924, he died in 1987. His August 2nd birthday this year would have been his 94th.

Once asked if he was a pessimist or an optimist, he replied, "I can't be a pessimist because I'm alive. To be a pessimist means that you have agreed that human life is an academic matter, so I'm forced to be an optimist. I'm forced to believe that we can survive whatever we must survive."

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
10 August 2018
...

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1 week ago

WarrenHall Crain

SAVING ELEPHANTS ... SAVING SALAMANDERS

Many animal species are threatened with extinction all around our planet. Here and there efforts are made to save at least some of them. Here are two examples.

(1) MOZAMBIQUE – GORONGOSA NATIONAL PARK – A LIVING LABORATORY
Thirty years ago, a war destroyed 95% of the park’s large animals. Now the government of Mozambique, with enormous contributions from American philanthropist Gregory C. Carr, is bringing the park and its ecology back to life, reintroducing species that are now mostly thriving, including elephants, baboons, wild dogs, lions, waterbuck, leopards, and zebras. Says Robert Pringle, a Princeton University ecologist who is on the park’s board of directors, “Gorongosa is not a Ming vase we’re trying to restore. It’s a dynamic ecosystem in recovery.”

(2) PATZCUARO, MEXICO – TWO DOZEN DOMINICAN NUNS – AND A RARE SPECIES OF SALAMANDER
These salamanders, known as achoques, are found nowhere on earth but Lake Patzcuaro, where their numbers are falling fast.
In this remote area, a Dominican convent is now home to two dozen nuns and about 300 achoques, saved and thriving in glass aquaria and white enamel bathtubs under the care of the nuns .
“It’s about protecting a species from nature,” said Sister Ofelia Morales Francisco (shown in the photo with an achoque). “If we don’t work to take care of it, to protect it, it will disappear from creation.”

The work that is happening in Gorongosa Park in Mozambique, and the Dominican convent in Patzcuaro, Mexico, may remind us of the words to the Methodist hymn by Cecil Frances Alexander:

All things bright and beautiful,
all creatures great and small,
all things wise and wonderful:
the Lord God made them all.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
6 August 2018
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1 week ago

WarrenHall Crain

THE ELEPHANT AND SALAMANDER HAVE THIS IN COMMON:
SOMEONE IS TRYING TO SAVE THEM.

Many animal species are threatened with extinction all around our planet.

Here and there efforts are made to save at least some of them.

(1) MOZAMBIQUE – GORONGOSA NATIONAL PARK – A LIVING LABORATORY
A bloody civil war in the 1980s and 1990s destroyed 95% of the park’s large animals. Now the government of Mozambique, with enormous contributions from American philanthropist Gregory C. Carr, is bringing the park and its ecology back to life, reintroducing species that are now mostly thriving, including elephants, baboons, wild dogs, lions, waterbuck, leopards, and zebras.

Says Robert Pringle, a Princeton University ecologist who is on the park’s board of directors, “Gorongosa is not a Ming vase we’re trying to restore. It’s a dynamic ecosystem in recovery.”

(2) PATZCUARO, MEXICO – TWO DOZEN DOMINICAN NUNS – AND A RARE SPECIES OF SALAMANDER
These salamanders, known as achoques, are found nowhere on earth but Lake Patzcuaro, where their numbers are falling fast.

In this remote area, a Dominican convent is now home to two dozen nuns and about 300 achoques, saved and thriving in glass aquaria and white enamel bathtubs under the care of the nuns .

“It’s about protecting a species from nature,” said Sister Ofelia Morales Francisco (shown in the photo with an achoque). “If we don’t work to take care of it, to protect it, it will disappear from creation.”

The work that is happening in Gorongosa Park in Mozambique, and the Dominican convent in Patzcuaro, Mexico, may remind us of the words to the Methodist hymn by Cecil Frances Alexander:

All things bright and beautiful,
all creatures great and small,
all things wise and wonderful:
the Lord God made them all.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
6 August 2018
...

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3 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

IT IS SUMMER. IT IS HOT !!!!!!!!
CAN WE GET COOL WITHOUT GETTING HOTTER?

Does this question make sense? Yes, because the refrigerants in air conditioners — hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) — destroy ozone and increase global warming. So getting cool makes the world hotter.

In a country like India with SUPER HOT SUMMERS low-income citizens can’t afford air conditioners. The government is working to provide more affordable air conditioners – which could make the climate even hotter.
HELP IS ON THE WAY.

A new generation of refrigerants — hydrofluroolefins (HFOS) — are categorized as having zero ODP (Ozone Depletion Potential) and low GWP (Global Warming Potential).
Manufacturers of new-generation air conditioners using HFOs are proving they can have business success while being environmentally responsible. (Doing well by doing good.)

Relief for the hottest corners of our globe may be on the way.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
27 July 2018
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3 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

IT’S HOT !!!!!!!!!!!
CAN WE GET COOL WITHOUT GETTING HOTTER?

Does this question make sense? Yes, because the refrigerants in air conditioners — hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) — destroy ozone and increase global warming. So getting cool makes the world hotter.

In a country like India with SUPER HOT SUMMERS low-income citizens can’t afford air conditioners. The government is working to provide more affordable air conditioners – which could make the climate even hotter.

HELP IS ON THE WAY.

A new generation of refrigerants — hydrofluroolefins (HFOS) — are categorized as having zero ODP (Ozone Depletion Potential) and low GWP (Global Warming Potential).
Manufacturers of new-generation air conditioners using HFOs are proving they can have business success while being environmentally responsible. (Doing well by doing good.)

Relief for the hottest corners of our globe may be on the way.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
28 July 2018
...

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4 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

PARAGUAY IS MALARIA-FREE.

Paraguay has eliminated malaria. The World Health Organization confirmed it in early July. Argentina may be declared malaria-free later this year.

You can get malaria from the bite of an infected mosquito – AND YOU WILL FEEL AWFUL.

I know. When I was 6 years old (in Burma with my missionary parents) I had malaria. It was like having terrible case of flu with aches and shaking chills. It is life-threatening if not treated.

Nearly half the world’s population is at risk of malaria. In 2015 there were roughly 212 million cases with an estimated 429,000 deaths, says WHO.

The malaria belt circles the world, encompassing about 100 countries in the tropical or subtropical areas of the Americas, Africa, South Asia, and East Asia.

How can a country eliminate malaria? It takes political will to devote the needed resources. Insecticide-impregnated bed nets must be widely distributed, mosquito populations controlled, and treatment made available.

The photo of the child under a mosquito net is from NOTHING BUT NETS, a grassroots campaign sponsored by the United Nations Foundation devoted to stamping out malaria around the world. They have helped to deliver 12 million bed nets to families in need and also fund other crucial interventions like diagnostics, treatment, and training healthcare workers. You can read about Nothing But Nets and make a donation at nothingbutnets.net/about/.

Now that polio has been eliminated in almost every country (last year only 17 cases were reported worldwide) we must fight even more fiercely to conquer malaria.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 July 2018
...

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4 weeks ago

WarrenHall Crain

CAN MALARIA BE CONQUERED?

Paraguay has eliminated malaria. The World Health Organization confirmed it in early July. Argentina may be declared malaria-free later this year.

You can get malaria from the bite of an infected mosquito – AND YOU WILL FEEL AWFUL.

I should know. When I was 6 years old (in Burma with my missionary parents) I had malaria. It was like having terrible case of flu with aches and shaking chills. Malaria is life threatening if not treated.

Nearly half the world’s population is at risk of malaria The World Health Organization states that In 2015 there were roughly 212 million cases with an estimated 429,000 deaths. The malaria belt circles the world, encompassing about 100 countries, mostly in the tropical or subtropical areas of the Americas, Africa, South Asia, and East Asia.

How can a country eliminate malaria? It takes political will to devote the needed resources. Insecticide-impregnated bed nets must be widely distributed, mosquito populations controlled, and treatment made available.

The photo of the child under a mosquito net is from NOTHING BUT NETS, a grassroots campaign sponsored by the United Nations Foundation devoted to stamping out malaria around the world. They have helped to deliver 12 million bed nets to families in need and also fund other crucial interventions like diagnostics, treatment, and training healthcare workers. You can read about Nothing But Nets and make a donation at nothingbutnets.net/about/.

Now that polio has been eliminated in almost every country (last year only 17 cases were reported worldwide) we must fight even more fiercely to conquer malaria.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 July 2018
...

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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

GREENING THE FIREWORKS – in INDIA ... and the WORLD

Chemicals create the beautiful colors of fireworks. Released into the atmosphere, they are harmful those who breathe the polluted air.
India’s annual Diwali “Festival of Lights” features so many fireworks that, in 2016, the pollution caused some schools to close. In 2017, India’s Supreme Court temporarily banned fireworks in New Delhi. (This year, Diwali will be celebrated November 6–7.)

CAN WE MAKE FIREWORKS LESS POLLUTING?

YES: There is a future for “green” fireworks. Several scientists, especially Professor Thomas Klapotke in Germany, are beginning to find coloring agents for fireworks that are less harmful.

A happy prospect for future celebrations.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
7 July 2018
...

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1 month ago

WarrenHall Crain

GREENING THE FIREWORKS – in AMERICA... INDIA... and the WORLD

Chemicals create the beautiful colors of fireworks. Released into the atmosphere, they are harmful those who breathe the polluted air.

The Fourth of July in America is not as bad as it sometimes gets in India. India’s annual Diwali “Festival of Lights” features so many fireworks that, in 2016, the pollution caused some schools to close. In 2017, India’s Supreme Court temporarily banned fireworks in New Delhi. (This year, Diwali will be celebrated November 6–7.)

CAN WE MAKE FIREWORKS LESS POLLUTING?

YES: There is a future for “green” fireworks. Several scientists, especially Professor Thomas Klapotke in Germany, are beginning to find coloring agents for fireworks that are less harmful.

A happy prospect for future celebrations.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
7 July 2018
...

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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

THE RED PANDA ... ADORABLE ... AND IN TROUBLE

Red pandas, native to the mountain slopes of western China and Nepal, are in trouble. The Internaitonal Union for the Conservation of Nature says they are threatened now by deforestation and disease. Climate change looms.

Human hearts go out to beautiful animals like whales ... tigers ... snow leopards ... baby seals — and cuddly red pandas. But ALL species are precious, including the ones we tend to dislike, such as cockroaches. (Name the creature that gives YOU the creeps.)

THE WEB OF LIFE includes every plant and every animal. Each plays its important role in Earth’s ecology. All must be protected — the ones we humans find adorable and the ones we don’t. In the words of the Anglican hymn by Cecil Frances Alexander ... ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL.

In his poem “Always,” Kiran Verma envisions a world “Where tigers roam the forests, And great whales roam the seas.” www.warrenhallcrain.com/always/

How can we protect Earth’s biodiversity? Please comment.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
29 June 2018
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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

“SUSTAINABLE HAPPINESS ... Live Simply, Live Well, Make a Difference”

“Sustainable Happiness” (edited by Sarah Van Gelder and the staff of Yes! Magazine) is a book I recommend. You can find it on Amazon at amzn.to/2ywexhx .

We all have responsibilities and concerns that require us to navigate our high-tech world. So our lives can be crowded and frantic. This book offers good tips about how to live more simply, more effectively, and more happily.

In Chapter 8, “Give Yourself a Break: Take a Tech Sabbath,” Erika Kosina advises uplugging once in a while to engage with the plain old world we lived in before computers and the Internet.

She lists 10 ways to take a day off. Here is my list, which is mostly the same as hers ... (to see her original list, get a copy of “Sustainable Happiness” and read Chapter 8):

1. Avoid technology
2. Connect with loved ones
3. Get outside
4. Listen to birdsong and other natural sounds
5. Avoid commerce
6. Light candles
7. Drink a cup of chai
8. Eat some ice cream
9. Enjoy silence
10. Read a real book you can hold in your hands

And here is one more:

Stop reading this Facebook post and turn off the device you are reading it on.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
22 June 2018
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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

5 TIPS TO REDUCE PLASTIC POLLUTION

Plastic takes a tragic toll on wildlife. On land and in the seas, some animals are surrounded by it. They eat it, get stuck in it, and die from it, says the World Wildlife Fund.

Like the sea turtle in the WWF photo.

Like the stork entangled in a plastic bag. (The stork was set free by the National Geographic photographer.)

HERE ARE 5 WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR PLASTIC FOOTPRINT
1. Bring your own GLASS water bottle. Fill it from your home tap.
2. Bring reusable shopping bags to the supermarket.
3. Bring a reusable cup for your morning coffee. A thrown-away styrofoam cup can last a million years.
4. Replace grocery-store cling film with the new beeswax wraps – 100% natural and environmentally friendly, they are made of 100% cotton, pine resin, jojobal oil, and local beeswax. Reusable and compostable.
5. Freshen your breath with mints instead of chewing gum, which (believe it or not) is made from the same plastic/vinyl that tire inner tubes are made of. Chewing gum is not degradable.

AND ...

LEAVE ONLY YOUR FOOTSTEPS.
TAKE YOUR RUBBISH WITH YOU WHEN YOU LEAVE THE BEACH OR CAMPSITE OR PARK. EVEN BETTER, DO A 10-MINUTE CLEAN-UP OF NEARBY TRASH OTHERS HAVE LEFT.

Don’t leave plastics behind. Remember: Forever is a long time.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
15 June 2018
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2 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

ONLY ONE POLIO CASE IN PAKISTAN SO FAR THIS YEAR

The little boy in the photo is crying as his mother bends to help him. He is 3 years old and trying to take a few steps, but his right leg and arm are painful and will not move. He is the only case of polio so far this year in Pakistan, a historical low. (His mother has not learned to read and cannot decipher the Urdu words on the sign behind her urging that children get vaccinated against polio. The sign says “Don’t let your child’s dreams go to waste.”)

The world is now very close to wiping out polio. Pakistan’s neighbor, India, eradicated polio in 2014. Now only three nations have not totally eradicated polio: Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria – although donors from around the world and local officials and volunteers are working hard to get all children in these countries vaccinated.

Some years ago in India I joined a polio eradication team from America on a whirlwind tour through the city of Meerut. We were able to immunize a few hundred children that day. “We had no illusions about our role,” I wrote in my journal. “We knew that we were only a very small part of the final push to eradicate polio from the world. We worked with thousands of volunteers who had been mustered to work in pulse polio booths around the country. Our role was to be a very visible sign that the rest of the world cares what happens to each of the children in these places we visited."

You can read the whole story in the chapter “National Immunization Day – Meerut” in my book READINGS FROM AN INDIA JOURNAL, amzn.to/1Ufzz2K

I am very proud of India’s 2014 victory over polio. There is going to be an incredible celebration in Rotary when the World Health Organization declares worldwide victory, as Rotary has been one of the strongest forces in the war on polio.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
5 June 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

THE SPACE AGE BEGINS

The 1960s began The Space Age:

• 1961–April 12, Yuri Gagarin, Russian Cosmonaut, makes the first suborbital flight.
• 1961–May 1, Alan Shepard, American Astronaut, makes the second suborbital flight.
• 1961–May 25, President Kennedy famously declares, “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.” (The goal was achieved.)
• 1962–Astronaut John Glenn is the first human to orbit the globe.
• 1967–The musical “Hair” features a song by James Rado and Gerome Ragni whose first lines can be considered an ode to human fascination with the wider universe:

“Good morning, starshine
The Earth says hello
You twinkle above us
We twinkle below”

• 1968—The movie “2001: A Space Odyssey,” created by the future historian Arthur C. Clarke and the cinematic genius Stanley Kubrick–now in 50th anniversary re-release–is considered one of the most important movies of all time, posing questions humans continue to pursue: Where did we come from? Where are we going?
[A personal note: I saw the original “2001: A Space Odyssey” in Cinemascope with my father in Manhattan. I hope to see it again in its re-release.]
• 1969—July 20, American Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin make the first human moon landing as Michael Collins pilots the Apollo 11 craft overhead.

So now we are in the sixth decade of the Age of Space.

My forthcoming book, a future history to publish in 2019, is titled FUTURE CHRONICLES: THE FIRST 500 YEARS OF THE AGE OF SPACE. It will be a history of the Space Age ... the nearly 60 years that have already elapsed and the 440 years to come.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
23 May 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

SETI: THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Three weeks ago NASA launched TESS, a small satellite that, for the next 2 years, will use powerful cameras to LOOK into the sky, seeking Earthlike planets that might support intelligent life.

And for the next 60 days, the powerful CSIRO Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia will LISTEN for radio signals from space that may suggest an intelligent source. (The project is named BREAKTHROUGH LISTEN.)

Whether looking from Earth orbit ... or listening from Australia ... the search for intelligent life goes on ... as does the question “What will happen if we find it?”

My next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (2019), will provide an answer.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
11 May 2018
...

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3 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

SETI: THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Three weeks ago NASA launched TESS, a small satellite that, for the next 2 years, will use powerful cameras to LOOK into the sky, seeking Earthlike planets that might support intelligent life.

And for the next 60 days, the powerful CSIRO Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia will LISTEN for radio signals from space that may suggest an intelligent source. (The project is named BREAKTHROUGH LISTEN.)

Whether looking from Earth orbit ... or listening from Australia ... the search for intelligent life goes on ... as does the question “What will happen if we find it?”

My next book, FUTURE CHRONICLES (2019), will provide an answer.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
11 May 2018
...

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4 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

“WHERE TIGERS ROAM THE FORESTS...”

The World Wildlife Fund now offers a “Symbolic Adoption” program. A donation helps make sure tigers and hundreds of other species survive on our planet. For your gift you can choose a species you want to adopt and receive a kit that includes a stuffed toy (like the toy tiger shown), an adoption certificate, and a photo and information about your chosen species. The kit makes a wonderful gift for a child and a lesson about our human responsibility for all the world’s creatures.

On page 105 of my book THE MESSAGE, Kiran Verma’s poem “Always” envisions a Utopian world “Where tigers roam the forests, And great whales roam the seas.” So I chose the photo of the tiger from the WWF Symbolic Adoption site: bit.ly/2dK0x8c.

My book THE MESSAGE — that includes Kiran Verma’s poem — is listed on Amazon at amzn.to/1Au8iAd. You can read it free if you belong to Kindle Unlimited.

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
1 May 2018
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4 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS — OFF TO SEEK ALIEN WORLDS

Go to bit.ly/2Jcjhcm to see a video of TESS’s launch — perfect launch on Wednesday, April 18.

TESS herself will not go to the stars. The little spacecraft (about the size of a washing machine) has nestled into an orbit between Earth and the moon. But, starting in June, her telescopes will spend two years searching the sky for nearby stars orbited by planets with Earthlike conditions, some of which may support intelligent life.

TESS will help to answer the age-old question: Are we alone?

“Ad astra per aspira,” is the motto of the state of Kansas, a Latin phrase that means “To the stars through difficulties.”

There are difficulties to overcome as we explore the universe and reach out to other stars and planets. But TESS (a cooperative project of NASA and SpaceX) is a major step on the journey.

I watched the rocket launch Wednesday. Perhaps you did, too. VERY EXCITING TO BE SURE!

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 April 2018
...

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4 months ago

WarrenHall Crain

TESS — OFF TO SEEK ALIEN WORLDS

Go to bit.ly/2Jcjhcm to see a video of TESS’s launch — a perfect launch on Wednesday, April 18.

TESS herself will not go to the stars. The little spacecraft (about the size of a washing machine) has nestled into an orbit between Earth and the moon. But, starting in June, her telescopes will spend two years searching the sky for nearby stars. Some are probably orbited by planets with Earthlike conditions, which might support intelligent life.

TESS will help to answer the age-old question: Are we alone?

“Ad astra per aspira,” is the motto of the state of Kansas, a Latin phrase that means “To the stars through difficulties.”

There are difficulties to overcome as we explore the universe and reach out to other stars and planets. But TESS (a cooperative project of NASA and SpaceX) is a major step on the journey.

I watched the rocket launch Wednesday. Perhaps you did, too. VERY EXCITING TO BE SURE!

WarrenHall Crain
Seattle, Washington
20 April 2018
...

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2 Comments on “Facebook Posts”

  1. Pingback: (E MINUS 140) 1 NOVEMBER 2015 #7 TRAGEDY ON THE AEGEAN — AMERICA MUST HELP - WarrenHall Crain for Kiran Verma's Vision

  2. U Kyaw Win

    Warren Crain is a prolific writer/story teller. His books are a good read which speaks from his heart about the human condition.

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